Venus Fly Trap | Dionaea Muscipula

The Dionaea Muscipula, otherwise known as the Venus fly trap, is characterized by its ability to eat live bugs such as flies. You might also know it by it’s green and/or pink claw or mouth-like traps. Additionally, this plant originated in North Carolina, in the United States of America.

Dionaea Muscipula | Venus Fly Trap

Dionaea Muscipula Plant Information

Botanical Name: Dionaea Muscipula

Nicknames: Venus Fly Trap

Origin: North Carolina, US, North America

Size: The size of the Dionaea Muscipula varies from 2 cm to 10 cm. These plants are generally bushier than they are tall.

Dionaea Muscipula Plant Care

Here are tips to taking care of your Dionaea Muscipula including watering, lighting, propagation, and more!

Lighting Preferences

The venus fly trap prefers very bright direct light. Be sure not to burn the foliage; however, provide a very bright lighting situation.

Watering The Dionaea Muscipula

This plant needs to remain moist but without being soggy. Further, the roots are sensitive and should only be watered with distilled water. 

Fertilizing The Venus Fly Trap

Do not fertilize as this will hard the roots.

Temperature Preferences

Keep this plant in temperatures between  60°-90° F. Additionally, keep the plant away from cold drafts which can damage the plant.

Humidity Preferences

Dionaea Muscipula prefers normal household humidity. You could use a dehumidifier in high humidity environments or a humidifier in low humidity environments; however, strive for normal humidity.

Soil Preferences

This plant requires nutrient-low soil. To achieve this you could use long-fiber sphagnum moss and mix it with regular peat moss.

Pruning the Venus Fly Trap

Pruning this plant requires trimming the flowering stems. If you want seeds, do not trim these stems.

How to Propagate the Dionaea Muscipula

One of the most common and effective ways to propagate this plant is by using plant division. Learn more about propagating with plant division HERE.

Potential Problems with Dionaea Muscipula

The roots are very sensitive and use of proper water and soil is essential for a healthy fly trap. Do proper research regarding these areas before purchasing and caring for the venus fly trap.

Poison Information

The Dionaea Muscipula is generally not considered poisonous. If you would like more information regarding poison levels, you can read more about 5 different poison levels HERE.

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Overview of the Venus Fly Trap Care

NicknameVenus Fly Trap
Botanical NameDionaea Muscipula
LightingBright Indirect Light
WateringDistilled Water; Moist not soggy
FertlizationNone
Temperature60°-90° F
HumidityNormal
SoilNutrient-Low Soil
PruningTrim Flowering Stems
Propagation Plant Division
Poison LevelNot Poisonous
Dionaea Muscipula | Venus Fly Trap

Plant Care Equipment

Calathea Zebrina | Zebra Plant

The Calathea Zebrina, otherwise known as the zebra plant is characterized by its large leaves on long stalks. These leaves have stripes like a zebra. This plant originated in Brazil.

Calathea Zebrina Information

Botanical Name: Calathea Zebrina

Nicknames: Zebra plant

Origin: Brazil, Mexico

Size: The size of Calathea Zebrina can be up to 3 feet tall iwth leaves as big as 15 inches.

Zebra Plant Care

Here are tips to taking care of your Aucuba Japonica Variegata.

Lighting Preferences

The zebra plant prefers bright indirect light.

Watering the Zebra Plant

Allow the top few inches to dry between watering. Water soil evenly, but do not over water your plant. During the summer season, keep the soil moist, and water less frequently during winter.

Fertilizing the Zebra Plant

Fertilize every 2 weeks, April through October, but dilute the fertilizer to half strength.

Temperature Preferences

Between  65°-75° F, keep away from cold drafts.

Humidity Preferences

The zebra plant prefers high humidity, mist if necessary.

Soil Preferences

Calathea Zebrina does best in 2 parts peat moss and 1 part perlite.

How to Propagate the Zebra Plant

One of the most common and effective ways to propagate the venus fly trap is by using plant division. Learn more about propagating with plant division HERE.

Potential Problems With The Calathea Zebrina

Leaves may drop, curl, and turn brown due to low humidity or a cool draft. The changes in the leaves may also be due to a lack of proper watering. A limp stem may be due to overwatering.

Poison Information

The venus fly trap is generally not considered poisonous. Read more about poison levels HERE.

Purchase a Calathea Zebrina

Calathea Zebrina | Zebra Plant

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Haworthia Fasciata | Zebra Haworthia

The Haworthia Fasciata, otherwise known as the Zebra Haworthia or Zebra Cactus is characterized by stripes that resemble zebra stripes. This plant originated in South Africa.

Haworthia Fasciata Information

Botanical Name: Haworthia Fasciata, Haworthia Attenuata

Nicknames: Zebra Haworthia or Zebra Cactus

Origin: South Africa

Size: The size of Haworthia Fasciata varies from 4 inches to over 8 inches tall. 

Zebra Haworthia Plant Care

Here are tips for taking care of your Haworthia Fasciata.

Lighting Preferences

The Zebra Haworthia prefers very bright indirect or direct light.

Watering Your Zebra Haworthia

Allow the soil to dry between watering. Water soil evenly, but do not over water your plant. Learn more about over-watering plants HERE.

Fertilizer Preferences

Fertilize your Zebra Haworthia every month, April through September, but dilute the fertilizer to half strength

Temperature Preferences

The Zebra Haworthia prefers temperatures between  65° – 80°F.

Humidity Preferences

Zebra Haworthia prefers normal indoor humidity.

Soil Preferences

Zebra Haworthia does best in a well-draining cactus soil.

How to Propagate your Zebra Haworthia

Propagating the Zebra Haworthia is similar to that of succulents. One of the most common and effective ways to propagate the venus fly trap is by using plant cuttings. Learn more about propagating with plant cuttings HERE.

Potential Problems with the Zebra Haworthia

There are no additional problems to note regarding the Haworthia Fasciata. Like most houseplants, this plant is susceptible to root rot from overwatering. Learn more about root rot HERE and overwatering HERE.

Poison Information

The zebra haworthia is generally not considered poisonous. Read more about poison levels HERE.

Purchase a Zebra Haworthia

Haworthia Fasciata Zebra Haworthia

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Howea Forsteriana | Kentia Palm | Paradise Palm

The Howea Forsteriana, otherwise known as the Kentia palm or Paradise palm is characterized by beautiful dark palm leaves. This is of the most expensive indoor palms. This plant originated in Australia.

Plant Information

Botanical Name: Howea Forsteriana

Nicknames: Kentia Palm, Paradise Palm

Origin: Australia

Size: The size of Kentia Palm varies from 4 feet to 12 feet in height, though it is slow to grow.

Howea Forsteriana | Kentia Palm

Plant Care

Lighting: Howea Forsteriana prefers indirect light, but can survive in low light.

Watering: Allow the top few inches to dry between watering. Water soil evenly, but do not over water your plant. The Kentia palm is sensitive to salt, fluoride, and chlorine in the water. Do not use water that has gone through a softener.

Fertilizing: Fertilize your palm monthly in the spring and summer, but dilute fertilizer to half strength

Temperature: Between  65°-85.° F, keep away from cold drafts.

Humidity: The Kentia Palm does well in average household humidity

Soil: The Paradise Palm does best in well-aerated loose soil. You may add sand if the soil is too caked.

Pruning: Do not prune palms. If a branch is dead, cut it off with sharp shears. Trimming palms do not encourage new growth.

Propagation: Propagating the Kentia palm requires an expert and is done using seeds.

Potential Problems: Be sure to remove dust from leaves. Spray with warm soapy water every few weeks to avoid pests. Elephant Ears are susceptible to disease when over-watered.

Pests:

  • Spider mites
  • mealybugs

Poison Information: This palm is non-poisonous.

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Howea Forsteriana | Kentia Palm

Houseplant Poison Levels

Each houseplant falls on a toxicity spectrum. Below are 4 levels of toxicity or poisonous levels. These levels are general guidelines. If you are concerned for any reason call poison control.

Non-Toxic Plants

These are plants that are not poisonous or toxic. Despite not being toxic, there is always a risk for allergic reactions to any plant.

Examples: Grape Ivy, China Doll, Baby’s Tears, Bird’s Nest Ferns, Cast Iron Plant, Money Tree, Lucky Bamboo, Phoenix Roebelenii, Lady Palms, Fittonia, Hypoestes, Prayer plant, Rabbit’s Foot Fern, Calatheas, Yucca

Level 1

Poison level 1 plants are considered to have low toxicity. These plants are generally not poisonous, though there is always a risk for allergic reaction to any plant.

Examples: Ficus LyrataAloe Vera Plant, Peperomia, Ctenanthe, Dracaena Warneki, Homalomena, Ficus Benjamina, Tradescantia Albiflora, Schefflera Actinophylla, Rubber Tree , Philodendron Xanadu , Snake Plant

Level 2

Poison level 2 plants have mild to severe toxicity.  These plants should avoid being eaten as side effects may be experienced.

Examples: Monstera DeliciosaEpipremnum Aureum (Pothos), Ficus Alii, Arrowhead plants, Dracaena Marginatas, Agave plants, Fishtail Palm, Cordyline Terminalis, Peace Lily plants, Chinese Evergreen, Aralias

Level 3

Poison level 3 plants are very toxic. These plants should avoid being eaten as side effects may be experienced.

Examples: Philodendron Selloum, Moses in the Cradle, Caladiums, Croton, English Ivy 

Level 4

Poison level 4 plants are extremely toxic. These plants should not be eaten as side effects may be experienced and this may be life-threatening.

Examples: Alocasia AmazonicaAlocasia Macrorrhiza, Zamioculcas zamiifolia, Sago Palm, Dieffenbachias, Pencil Cactus, 

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