Giant Peace Lily Re-potting

peace lily repotting

Last summer I bought two large peace lily plants from a box store near me. After purchasing these guys, I separated them and they are doing well. While they were beaten up from my recent move, they were ready to be re-potted. Hangout with me while I re-pot one of my massive peace lilies!

Repotting this massive plant by myself is always difficult, but worth it! Watch as I accidentally slap myself in the face with a peace lily leaf, spill dirt on myself, and a ton more! Do you want more re-potting content? You’re in luck because I post videos where I re-pot, plant, unbox, and more with my 200+ houseplants! All you have to do to get this content is SUBSCRIBE.

Plant Care Stuff I Used In This Video

Basic Peace Lily Care

Lighting bright indirect light
WateringAllow soil to dry some between waterings
FertilizingEvery other month at half strength in the spring and summer
Temperature 65° – 80°F
Humidity High humidity
Soil Well-aerated soil with peat moss
Poison Information Level 2

Get more detailed peace lily care information HERE.

Check out my massive repotting series!

Here is part 1 of my massive repotting session. In this part, I re-pot a pothos, unknown plant, pineapple plant, and sansevieria or snake plant. Also, I just do some chatting!

Here is part 2 of my massive repotting session. In this part, I re-pot a Christmas tree, philodendron Brasil, and a zz plant. Also, I just do some chatting!

Here is part 3 of my massive repotting session. In this part, I re-pot a two different pothos, Dracaena deremensis ‘Janet Craig’, calathea, and two different sansevieria or snake plant. Also, I just do some chatting!

peace lily repotting

Aucuba Japonica ‘Variegata | Gold Dust Plant

The Aucuba Japonica Variegata, otherwise known as the Gold Dust Plant is characterized by the gold-colored speckles on the leaves. This plant originated in Asia.

Aucuba Japonica ‘Variegata | Gold Dust Plant

Aucuba Japonica Variegata Plant Information

Botanical Name: Aucuba Japonica Variegata

Nicknames: Gold Dust Plant

Origin: Asia

Size: The size of Aucuba Japonica Variegata varies from 6 inches to over 10 feet tall, the leaves can be as large as 8 inches. 

Gold Dust Plant Care

Here are tips to taking care of your Aucuba Japonica Variegata.

Lighting Preferences

This plant requires shaded light to have brighter leaves. If the plant receives too much sunlight, the leaves will turn black.

Watering The Gold Dust Plant

Allow the top few inches to dry between watering. Water soil evenly, but do not over water your plant.

Fertilizing the Gold Dust Plant

Use an acid-based fertilizer in the spring.

Temperature

This plant survives in mild temperatures hardiness zones 7b through 10.

Humidity

Aucuba Japonica Variegata prefers high humidity when in temperatures above 73 *F.

Soil

This plant adapts well to most soil except waterlogged soil. We recommend using potting soil and adding perlite or similar.

Pruning the Gold Dust Plant

Cut this plant at the leaf joints in the spring. Be careful when pruning this plant so that the shrub is not damaged.

How to Propagate the Aucuba Japonica Variegata

One of the most common and effective ways to propagate the gold dust plant is by using plant cuttings. Learn more about propagating with plant cuttings HERE.

Potential Problems with the Gold Dust Plant

This plant does not have many pests or disease problems. Gold dust plants are; however, sensitive to being over-watered. Learn more about over-watering HERE.

Pests

Here is a list of common pests for the gold dust plant.

  • Scale Insects

Disease

Here is a list of common diseases for the gold dust plant.

Poison Information

The Gold dust plant has a level 2 poison level. Read more about poison levels HERE.

Purchase A Gold Dust Plant

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Calathea Zebrina | Zebra Plant

The Calathea Zebrina, otherwise known as the zebra plant is characterized by its large leaves on long stalks. These leaves have stripes like a zebra. This plant originated in Brazil.

Calathea Zebrina Information

Botanical Name: Calathea Zebrina

Nicknames: Zebra plant

Origin: Brazil, Mexico

Size: The size of Calathea Zebrina can be up to 3 feet tall iwth leaves as big as 15 inches.

Zebra Plant Care

Here are tips to taking care of your Aucuba Japonica Variegata.

Lighting Preferences

The zebra plant prefers bright indirect light.

Watering the Zebra Plant

Allow the top few inches to dry between watering. Water soil evenly, but do not over water your plant. During the summer season, keep the soil moist, and water less frequently during winter.

Fertilizing the Zebra Plant

Fertilize every 2 weeks, April through October, but dilute the fertilizer to half strength.

Temperature Preferences

Between  65°-75° F, keep away from cold drafts.

Humidity Preferences

The zebra plant prefers high humidity, mist if necessary.

Soil Preferences

Calathea Zebrina does best in 2 parts peat moss and 1 part perlite.

How to Propagate the Zebra Plant

One of the most common and effective ways to propagate the venus fly trap is by using plant division. Learn more about propagating with plant division HERE.

Potential Problems With The Calathea Zebrina

Leaves may drop, curl, and turn brown due to low humidity or a cool draft. The changes in the leaves may also be due to a lack of proper watering. A limp stem may be due to overwatering.

Poison Information

The venus fly trap is generally not considered poisonous. Read more about poison levels HERE.

Purchase a Calathea Zebrina

Calathea Zebrina | Zebra Plant

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Haworthia Fasciata | Zebra Haworthia

The Haworthia Fasciata, otherwise known as the Zebra Haworthia or Zebra Cactus is characterized by stripes that resemble zebra stripes. This plant originated in South Africa.

Haworthia Fasciata Information

Botanical Name: Haworthia Fasciata, Haworthia Attenuata

Nicknames: Zebra Haworthia or Zebra Cactus

Origin: South Africa

Size: The size of Haworthia Fasciata varies from 4 inches to over 8 inches tall. 

Zebra Haworthia Plant Care

Here are tips for taking care of your Haworthia Fasciata.

Lighting Preferences

The Zebra Haworthia prefers very bright indirect or direct light.

Watering Your Zebra Haworthia

Allow the soil to dry between watering. Water soil evenly, but do not over water your plant. Learn more about over-watering plants HERE.

Fertilizer Preferences

Fertilize your Zebra Haworthia every month, April through September, but dilute the fertilizer to half strength

Temperature Preferences

The Zebra Haworthia prefers temperatures between  65° – 80°F.

Humidity Preferences

Zebra Haworthia prefers normal indoor humidity.

Soil Preferences

Zebra Haworthia does best in a well-draining cactus soil.

How to Propagate your Zebra Haworthia

Propagating the Zebra Haworthia is similar to that of succulents. One of the most common and effective ways to propagate the venus fly trap is by using plant cuttings. Learn more about propagating with plant cuttings HERE.

Potential Problems with the Zebra Haworthia

There are no additional problems to note regarding the Haworthia Fasciata. Like most houseplants, this plant is susceptible to root rot from overwatering. Learn more about root rot HERE and overwatering HERE.

Poison Information

The zebra haworthia is generally not considered poisonous. Read more about poison levels HERE.

Purchase a Zebra Haworthia

Haworthia Fasciata Zebra Haworthia

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Dracaena Deremensis | Lemon Lime Plant

The Dracaena Deremensis, otherwise known as the Lemon Lime plant is characterized by its green and white sword-like leaves. This plant originated in Africa.

Plant Information

Botanical Name: Dracaena Deremensis

Nicknames: Lemon Lime plant

Origin: Africa

Size: The size of Dracaena Deremensis varies from 1 to 2 feet

Plant Care

Lighting: The lemon lime plant can adapt to low light conditions, though it does better in medium to bright indirect light.

Watering: Allow the top half of the soil to dry between watering. Leaf tips will brown if the soil becomes too moist or too dry.

Fertilizing: Fertilize plant every month, spring and summer, with a liquid fertilizer diluted to half strength.

Temperature: Keep the lemon lime plant between  70°-75° F

Humidity: Dracaena Deremensis prefers high humidity, but does fine in average household humidities.

Soil: This plant does best in fast draining, well-aerated loose soil. Lava rocks can also be mixed in.

Pruning: Remove browning leaf tips using a pair of wet scissors. Stalks can be trimmed at any point and new growth will develop below the cut.

Propagation: Use stem cuttings.

Potential Problems: Be sure to remove dust and anything else from leaves to help avoid potential problems. 

Pests:

  • Spider mites
  • Mealybugs

Disease: 

  • Fluoride toxicity
  • Fusarium Leaf Spot Disease

Poison Information: The Lemon Lime plant is considered poisonous to household pets.

My Plant Care Picks

Caladium | Elephant Ear Plant

Howea Forsteriana | Kentia Palm | Paradise Palm

The Howea Forsteriana, otherwise known as the Kentia palm or Paradise palm is characterized by beautiful dark palm leaves. This is of the most expensive indoor palms. This plant originated in Australia.

Plant Information

Botanical Name: Howea Forsteriana

Nicknames: Kentia Palm, Paradise Palm

Origin: Australia

Size: The size of Kentia Palm varies from 4 feet to 12 feet in height, though it is slow to grow.

Howea Forsteriana | Kentia Palm

Plant Care

Lighting: Howea Forsteriana prefers indirect light, but can survive in low light.

Watering: Allow the top few inches to dry between watering. Water soil evenly, but do not over water your plant. The Kentia palm is sensitive to salt, fluoride, and chlorine in the water. Do not use water that has gone through a softener.

Fertilizing: Fertilize your palm monthly in the spring and summer, but dilute fertilizer to half strength

Temperature: Between  65°-85.° F, keep away from cold drafts.

Humidity: The Kentia Palm does well in average household humidity

Soil: The Paradise Palm does best in well-aerated loose soil. You may add sand if the soil is too caked.

Pruning: Do not prune palms. If a branch is dead, cut it off with sharp shears. Trimming palms do not encourage new growth.

Propagation: Propagating the Kentia palm requires an expert and is done using seeds.

Potential Problems: Be sure to remove dust from leaves. Spray with warm soapy water every few weeks to avoid pests. Elephant Ears are susceptible to disease when over-watered.

Pests:

  • Spider mites
  • mealybugs

Poison Information: This palm is non-poisonous.

My Plant Care Picks

Howea Forsteriana | Kentia Palm

Sansevieria Trifasciata | Snake Plant

The Sansevieria Trifasciata, otherwise known as the snake plant or mother-in-law’s tongue plant is characterized by thick tall tongue-like leaves with varying patterns. This plant is incredibly easy to care for and incredibly difficult to kill. These plants originated in South Africa.

Plant Information

Botanical Name: Sansevieria Trifasciata

Nicknames: Snake Plant, Mother-In-Law’s Tongue

Origin: South Africa

Size: The Sansevieria Trifasciata can grow to be as tall as 4 feet tall.

Plant Care

Lighting: The snake plant can thrive in nearly any lighting. They grow fast and taller in brighter light.

Watering: The snake plant does well when neglected and is nearly impossible to kill. Allow the soil to dry completely before watering the Sansevieria Trifasciata as over-watering is the main way these plants die.

Fertilizing: Feed Sansevieria monthly while it is actively growing. Feed with a Cactus Plant food that is half diluted. Do not use a fertilizer that contains nitrates.

Temperature: Between 60°-85.° F.

Humidity: The snake plant does well in low humidity.

Soil: Use a well-draining potting soil, add sand for better drainage.

Propagation: Use plant division or leaf cuttings.

Potential Problems: The snake plant is not affected by house pests or disease.

Poison Information: Plant not very poisonous, level 1 toxicity.

PINTEREST-houseplant-dictionary-snake-plant

What is Air Layering & How to Use it

According to RHS.org, air layering is…

“method of propagating new trees and shrubs from stems still attached to the parent plant.”

featured image source

Air layering is used for plants that do not root well. Some plants which air layering can be used for are camellia, Chaenomeles, daphnes, ficus, forsythia, hamamelis, philodendron, viburnums, Azalea, Holly, Magnolia.

When to Air Layer

Air layering is best done in spring or fall.

Materials Required

  • peat moss
  • sharp sterilized cutting tool
  • plastic wrap or aluminum foil
  • small piece of thin plastic
  • string
  • water

How to Air Layer Your Plants

In order to air layer, wrap a wounded part of your stem in moist sphagnum moss.

  1. The stem should be wounded below the node using an upward 1-inch slash. Hormone rooting compound can be applied to the surface of the wound if you choose.
  2. Wedge a small piece of wood into the cut so that it does not close
  3. Wrap the moss around the cut and secure it with string or twine.
  4. Cover the moss in aluminum foil first then plastic wrap to conserve the moisture.

Most plants with root in a couple weeks to a month. Once there are roots, remove the material and pot the plant as you normally would.

Potential Problems Air Layering

Clear plastic can encourage algae growth or sunscald, avoid by using black plastic or using aluminum foil.